31 Mar 2017

Hull 2017 Highlights, 1-7 April

Goblin Wizards, washed up car-go and J.K Rowling… get a little cultured this week

ELIZA CARTHY WITH ARMS WIDE ORCHESTRA 

Hull Truck Theatre (£17.50), 8pm, Thursday 6 April

Introduced by Kathryn Tickell, Eliza Carthy leads the Arms Wide Orchestra in contemporary alternative folk music inspired by the legacy of Hull’s Waterson family, featuring some of the finest young singers on the English folk scene, plus percussion and electronics.

The group will be supported by folk singer Olivia Chaney.

Broadcast on BBC Radio 3 on Friday 7th April 2300 – 0100.

THE TRANSGLOBAL ART OF MARK WIGAN 

Museum of Club Culture (Free) 10.30am, Free, Thursday 6 April

Since graduating from the Hull School of Art and Design in 1982, Mark Wigan has become one of the UK’s most influential graphic artists. He pioneered urban art in London, New York and Tokyo in 1980s and 1990s, creating social and cultural hieroglyphs for our time and drawing inspiration from subcultures and street style from around the world.

This exhibition features videos and photography of live performances, exhibitions and projects undertaken over the last 30 years in Europe, USA and Asia and recent paintings, sculptures and prints.

AAAAAAARRRGGH! DINOSAURS! DOMMY B 

Withernsea Meridian Centre (£2-£3) 7pm, Friday 7 April

A young troll girl finds herself defending her town from deadly dinosaurs! Recruiting allies – a powerful goblin wizard and a snotty, bogey blowing dragon – does she have what it takes to save the day?

Aaaaaaaaaaaaagh! Dinosaurs! is an engaging and hilarious poetry show for children and families. There’ll be rhymes, silliness and a lot of joining in as the audience help Dommy B deal with the deadly dinosaurs for good. The audience will guide the action as Dommy B improvises around their suggestions, creating a whole world on stage with only his words and a pen and paper. This imaginative and charming show has toured around theatres, festivals and schools, delighting children and presenting them with lovable, accessible poetry.

WASHED UP CAR-GO 

The Deep (Free) Until 4 June

The first installation as part of the Look Up artworks in partnership with The Deep is artist Chris Dobrowolski, who studied at Hull School of Art and Design. While there he spent most of his time building different vehicles in which to escape. He’s somehow come full circle and, for Hull 2017, he will be bringing the beach of the Humber to the car park of The Deep.

The work consists of three very ordinary cars placed in the car park of The Deep. Yet if you look closely, the interiors have been replaced with a high tideline of three beaches around Hull. Hidden among the sand are films that bring together these cars and plastic items, demonstrating the effects of plastic pollution. By association, Washed Up Car-go touches upon issues to do with pollution, consumerism and the tradition of maritime art.

 

PAUL SMITH TO J.K ROWLING: BP PORTRAIT AWARD 

Brynmor Jones Library, University of Hull, 29 March – 11 June

Each year, the Trustees of the National Portrait Gallery commission a portrait from the winner of the BP Portrait Award resulting in a selection of portraits of some of Britain’s best known cultural figures. The exhibition represents the diversity, creativity and vision of a group of people who have shaped Britain today, and the best in contemporary portraiture.

The exhibition features portraits of some of Britain’s best known cultural figures including Dame Kelly Holmes, actors Sir Ian McKellen and Dame Helen Mirren, as well as author J.K. Rowling and designer Paul Smith.

Exhibition opening times are: Mon-Fri, 10am-7pm; Sat-Sun, 10am-5pm.

THE TRAIN TRACK AND THE BASKET BY CLAIRE BARBER 

Hull Paragon Interchange (Free) 7 April – 29 June

Claire Barber’s installation at Hull’s Paragon Station, part of the Look Up programme, explores the phenomenon of ‘transmigration’, and the notion that skills and belongings traverse transport routes alongside people.

Between 1848 and 1914, more than two million people arrived into Hull by ship from mainland Europe, and left by train to the transatlantic ports of Liverpool and Southampton, seeking new lives in the New World. This mass movement of people, many of whom were in Hull for just a few hours, ended abruptly with the outbreak of the First World War.

 

 

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